Ariix review – legit or scam?

Ariix is a boutique multilevel marketing company that targets a specific lifestyle niche instead of a specific product niche.

Ariix’s target market is people who are interested in healthy, clean living that embraces alternative therapies and treatments for their physical ailments.

Did I get on board? This explains everything:


The company provides a suite of products, ranging from a home air purification unit to water filters (both home units and portable water bottle filters) as well as homeopathic remedies, cosmetics, weight loss products, and other things that fit into their target market’s lifestyle niche.

Their product offers are split into several different lines, with flashy 21st century names like “Nutrifii” and “Slenderiize.”

As you might guess, these are, respectively, a nutritional supplement line of products and a weight loss line of products.

In terms of popularity, Ariix has been experiencing a slow, steady rise in name recognition since midway through 2015.

The upward trend in search engine traffic shows no evidence of abating any time soon, so if the products and business model look legitimate, it could be a good time to get in on an upward-trending network marketing organization.

Products

Ariix’s products come in different product lines that offer solutions to various objective or perceived problems in your life.  Ariix offers seven different flagship brands.

Nutrifii offers various supplements that cover several of the popular supplement genres: a multivitamin, a superfood drink, a calcium supplement for bone health, an omega 3 fatty acid supplement for brain and heart health, and so on.

Slenderiize is a combination of meal replacement shakes, vitamin supplements, homeopathic supplements, and a 1250 calorie daily diet plan that’s designed for rapid, effective weight loss.

Puritii offers water filters and home air filtration systems that are supposed to remove toxins from the air you breathe and the water you drink.

Reviive is a body care line, with body wash, shampoo, soap, and other daily personal care products.  In keeping with the company’s slick design, they are all organic boutique-style products.

Priime is a line of essential oils which blend chemical extracts with natural plant materials.  The essential oil line is a suite of products itself, with solutions to all sorts of different problems marketed, with blends for relaxation, tension relief, immune system boosting, and more.

Jouve is a beauty product line, though currently its selection is limited to an anti-aging cream and a dark/bright spot correction solution.

Finally, Ariix’s stab at a superfood green powder is Asantae.  Somewhat uniquely, Ariix’s Asantae blends include both fruit and vegetable concentrates as well as probiotics.

There are two notable facts about Ariix’s products that differentiate it from the competition.

The first is the price—Ariix’s products are tremendously expensive, like their water filtration bottle which retails for over $100 and their weight loss supplement package that comes in at $399.

Unfortunately, these prices seem to mostly reflect the marketing style versus the substance: Nothing in the marketing material for Ariix’s water filters suggests they’d be superior from similar products that retail for less than half the price.

The ingredients of their clinical weight loss package are mostly unremarkable, save for their homeopathic ingredients.

The second and more unfortunate point is relevant here: the decision to include homeopathic ingredients reflects very poorly on the level of trust you can have in Ariix’s products.

Homeopathic remedies are universally rejected by mainstream science as being an effective treatment method.

Unlike herbal supplements, where there is conflicting research and some supplements (like green tea extract, for example) seem to have some legitimate, well-established uses, the very principles of homeopathy are contrary to modern scientific approaches to health and well-being.

As described in a 2002 scientific article by Edzard Ernst at the University of Exeter, several independent review studies on the effects of homeopathic remedies have been conducted, and none have found any effect for homeopathic remedies.

Skeptic scientist James Randi is known to regularly down bottle-fulls of homeopathic sleep medicine on stage, precisely because he knows it has no effect on the body whatsoever.

Compensation plan

To join Ariix as an income-eligible distributor, you need to order 150 product volume initially, plus a recurring order (autoship) of 75 product volume per month.

This doesn’t need to be personal use; you can sell it, though the retail discount is a relatively unimpressive 15% until you hit higher monthly product volumes.

Ariix’s networking plan also enables you to recruit an unlimited number of first line distributors below you and an unlimited depth of downline distributors.

The earning opportunity is actually not too bad, according to their income disclosure.  All active distributors averaged over $1500 a year, which is better than industry averages.  For most, though, this is a part-time gig.

Recap

The tricky part about Ariix is selling their tremendously expensive products.  You’ll do best if you are in an affluent area with prospective customers with a lot of disposable income and lifestyle interests that are compatible with the solutions that Ariix sells.

The products aren’t anything special.  They appeal more to tastes and sensibility than the actual substance or efficacy of the product.

If you can actually set up a reliable customer base for Ariix’s products and move a decent volume on a regular basis, the high product sales prices will get you a decent cash flow, since of course 15% of a big number is still a decent chunk of money.  But if you don’t have an effective business plan going in, you’ll find it hard to succeed.

If you’re set on MLM, Ariix isn’t terrible, but probably not the most profitable option out there either.

If you’re doing it for the money, there are better ways to kill your day job. You might like our coaching because it shows you the good life without peddling products to your family and friends.

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